Keratoconus Solutions
Bellevue, Kirkland, & Seattle

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Treatment

Typically, there are a few options available to help people who have keratoconus see more clearly, depending on severity: lenses, cross linking therapy, and surgery.

Vision correction—mild to moderate keratoconus can be corrected using eyeglasses or contact lenses. Some specialty contact lenses, such as RGP, hybrid, or scleral lenses, can make vision correction more comfortable for those with keratoconus.

Corneal collagen cross-linking—In this process, the corneal tissues are strengthened using riboflavin-medicated eye drops and ultraviolet light. This causes your cornea to stiffen, preventing further thinning and bulging. It doesn’t correct vision, but it can prevent progression.

Corneal transplant surgery—Scarring, extreme corneal thinning, and poor vision may lead you to need corneal transplant surgery. There are 2 types of transplant surgery: keratoplasty and deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK).

Keratoconus & Your Eyes

Keratoconus affects the shape of your cornea (the clear outer layer of your eye). When light enters your eye, it goes through your cornea first. An incorrectly-shaped cornea can cause glare like you might experience in a car during an early morning drive. Keratoconus typically develops in the late teens or early 20s, resulting the cornea bulging outward in the shape of a cone.
If you’re having difficulty managing bright lights or blurry vision when it’s sunny outside, you might be struggling with keratoconus. A comprehensive eye exam lets us learn what’s causing your vision problems and develop a plan to help you.If your vision is blurry, even with glasses or contact lenses, and you think you may have an irregularly shaped cornea, please come in for a comprehensive eye exam. Our optometrists are highly skilled in helping patients with keratoconus.

How Keratoconus Affects You

Advanced keratoconus can cause blurry vision, distortion, haloes, glare, and sensitivity to light, even with glasses on. It may also be uncomfortable to wear contact lenses.

How Keratoconus is Diagnosed

Symptoms of keratoconus typically appear in the late teenage years or early 20s and can progress for 10–20 years before slowing down and stabilizing. Keratoconus can also affect each eye at different rates. 

The doctors at Specialty Eye can diagnose the early stages of keratoconus at your comprehensive eye exams. 

Your risk of developing keratoconus could be increased if you:

  • Have a family history of keratoconus
  • Frequently & vigorously rub your eyes
  • Have certain conditions like hay fever, asthma, Down syndrome, and others

Refraction

Determining your prescription is an integral part of diagnosing keratoconus. Testing the refraction determines how light enters your eye. If you have keratoconus, light rays will not be able to come to a pinpoint focus on the retina. Your optometrist will use a phoropter (different lenses) and a retinoscope (a handheld device) to determine your refraction.

During your exam, your optometrist may use a slit lamp, which is a microscope with a bright light that is shined into your eye to illuminate the structures at the front of the eye. During the slit lamp exam, your optometrist evaluates the shape of your cornea and looks for other potential issues.

Corneal tomography and topography both take detailed images of the shape, dimensions, and thickness of your cornea—the frontmost part of your eye. Corneal mapping can often detect the earliest signs of keratoconus before other tests.

A quick and effective test for keratoconus is keratometry—your eye doctors will focus a circle of light on your eye and measure your corneal curvature. Having a very steep cornea is a sign of keratoconus.

Trusted Experts

Specialty Eye puts your eye health at the top of our priority list. We are always working to learn about the latest technologies and techniques available to best serve you. Our optometrists have extensive experience in treating and managing keratoconus symptoms. If needed, we will refer you to an ophthalmologist for advanced treatment. Book your appointment today to speak with our experts.

Our Locations

Bellevue

Steps away from beautiful Bellevue Square Mall, our office is conveniently located just off the I-405 on 106 Avenue NE.

  • 225 106 Ave. NE
  • Bellevue, WA 98004

Kirkland

Next to the Evergreen Hospital, our convenient location is on NE 128 Street, just off the I-405.

  • 11830 NE 128 St., Suite 1
  • Kirkland, WA 98034

Seattle

Only blocks from Pike Place Market, our office is on the corner of 4th Avenue and Stewart Street.

  • 1911 4th Ave.
  • Seattle, WA 98101

See What People Say About Us

Our Expert Blog

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There is so much more to your vision than clarity. Behind the scenes, dozens of intricate systems work together to support your sight, track objects, and support coordination.  Each system is essential to how you use your vision, but what happens when you have an eye issue like amblyopia? How might your vision change? And […]

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July 5, 2022
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Can Keratoconus Be Cured?

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When we think of an eyeball, we generally imagine it being perfectly round. However, there are many corneal irregularities that can change the shape of the eye, like keratoconus. Irregularly shaped corneas change how the eye looks, and how light is refracted to the back of the eye, which creates the crisp image we see. […]

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May 31, 2022
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Ortho-K: The Pros & Cons

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Today, there are many ways to correct vision for people of all ages. This includes specialty contact lenses like ortho-k that are often used to help manage myopia and provide clear sight for those with corneal irregularities. We’re here to let you in on a secret: the truth is, adults and children feel amazing about […]

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May 13, 2022
Dr. David Kading

There is so much more to your vision than clarity. Behind the scenes, dozens of intricate systems work together to support your sight, track objects, and support coordination.  Each system is essential to how you use your vision, but what happens when you have an eye issue like amblyopia? How might your vision change? And […]

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A person with keratoconus in their right eye

When we think of an eyeball, we generally imagine it being perfectly round. However, there are many corneal irregularities that can change the shape of the eye, like keratoconus. Irregularly shaped corneas change how the eye looks, and how light is refracted to the back of the eye, which creates the crisp image we see. […]

Read More…

A woman holding an Ortho-K lens between her fingers

Today, there are many ways to correct vision for people of all ages. This includes specialty contact lenses like ortho-k that are often used to help manage myopia and provide clear sight for those with corneal irregularities. We’re here to let you in on a secret: the truth is, adults and children feel amazing about […]

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